“Great is never the enemy of Good. This statement is true. And the truth of this statement explains why the greatest companies in the world are about the daily task, without note or fanfare, of doing the greatest good for the world.”

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“So . . . good (as in “good enough”) is the enemy of Great. But Great is never the enemy of Good. In both sentences, Collins’ and ours, we are talking about a matter that is at once practical and philosophical. “Did I make a difference?” and “Have I done well?” are questions that dog all the days of our lives, and these two questions always insist on showing up in conversation with each other.”

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“These questions and this conversation have been going on for a very long time. Adam Smith himself, in his 1759 The Theory of Moral Sentiments, suggested that creating capitalism absent the cultivation of those “moral sentiments” that produce social capital – the spirit and the actions of philanthropy – is like trying to create a forest of trees without roots. The Great and the Good are inseparably intertwined, Smith argued. Neither can thrive without the other”

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